KOREA – EU COOPERATION

The Republic of Korea is one of the priority partners of the EU in the global economy. The impressive economic and technological progress Korea has been demonstrating for last several decades has brought the country to the forefront of the world’s powerhouses. The Korean economy is now the 12th largest in the world, one of the strongest “Asian tigers” and a key trade & investments partner for Europe. Korean R&D expenditures are above 4% of the country’s GDP, well above Europe and the OECD average.

Korea-EU Agreement for S&T Cooperation

The first contact between Korean and European researchers and S&T authorities was established in the 1990’s. And the importance of EU-Korean S&T cooperation for both parties was recognized. This resulted in the inclusion of this area in EU-Korea MOU for S&T cooperation.

In November 2006, as a new breakthrough in S&T cooperation the Agreement on S&T Cooperation between Korea and the EU was signed. This agreement declares the importance of mutual access to the research, technological development and innovation programmes and projects of each party. The principle of reciprocity in providing access to research & innovation programs of the Parties is a new commitment that is crucial to building fair and mutually beneficial S&T cooperation. The Agreement entered into force in April 2007. Since then, cooperation has developed with a strong focus on key thematic areas and growing potential appeared such as in regards to mobility of researchers. In 2006 cooperation agreement on a Civil Global Navigation Satellite System and cooperation agreement for ITER-project between Korea and the EU were also signed.

  • Korea-EU MOU for S&T Cooperation (1992)
  • Korea-EU Agreement for S&T Cooperation (2006)
  • Korea-EU Agreement for ITER Cooperation (2006)
  • Korea-EU Agreement for Galileo Cooperation (2006)

Korea-EU Joint Science & Technology Cooperation Committee

It provides for the parties to meet regularly under the Korea-EU Joint Science and Technology Cooperation Committee (JSTCC). The 4th Korea-EU JSTCC was hosted by the European Commission, DG for Research & Innovation in Brussels on 26th June 2013. The EU noted that Korea is a key partner country in research and innovation and there is scope for cooperation and exchanges in a wide range of research areas. Both have world class facilities, researchers and programmes. The new European programme Horizon 2020 will offer new opportunities to reinforce international cooperation. Vice Minister Lee outlined Korea’s objective of developing a new vision for a creative economy, which has many similarities with the Innovation Union. Both sides exchanged views on recent developments and perspectives in S&T policies, reaffirming the importance of such cooperation in the overall partnership in this 50th anniversary year of EU-Korea relations.

Implementing Arrangement

In accordance with agreement on S&T cooperation, signed on 2006, the Implementing Arrangement between the European Commission and the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning of the Republic of Korea was signed on the 8th November 2013, following the EU-Republic of Korea Summit meeting. It aims to foster opportunities for European Research Council grant holders in Europe to host top researchers from Korea and to stimulate cooperation by bringing the best researchers together to exchange ideas and experiences. The Implementing Arrangement was signed between the European Commission by Commissioner Máire Geoghegan-Quinn and by Korea’s Minister of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Choi Mun-Kee.

Europe 2020 is the European Union’s 10-year growth strategy. It is about addressing the shortcomings of the EU’s growth model and creating the conditions for a different type of growth that is smarter, more sustainable and more inclusive.

Priorities

The Europe 2020 strategy is about delivering growth that is:

  •  Smart growth through more effective investments in education, research and innovation
  • Sustainable growth based on a decisive move towards a low-carbon economy
  • Economic governance to coordinate policy actions between the EU and national levels

Targets

Five key targets have been set for the EU to achieve by the end of the decade. These cover employment; education; research and innovation; social inclusion and poverty reduction; and climate/energy. Each Member State has adopted its own national targets in each of these areas. Concrete actions at EU and national levels underpin the strategy:

  • Employment: 75% of the 20-64 year-olds to be employed
  • R&D : 3% of the EU’s GDP to be invested in R&D
  • Climate change and energy sustainability:
    • Greenhouse gas emissions 20% lower than 1990
    • 20% of energy from renewable
    • 20% increase in energy efficiency
  • Education:
    • Reducing the rates of early school leaving below 10%
    • At least 40% of 30-34-year-olds completing third level education

Fighting poverty and social exclusion: at least 20 M fewer people in or at risk of poverty and social exclusion

Flagship initiatives

Europe has identified new engines to boost growth and jobs. These areas are addressed by 7 flagship initiatives, which can be categorized under three priorities. Within each initiative, both the EU and national authorities have to coordinate their efforts so they are mutually reinforcing. Most of these initiatives have been presented by the Commission in 2010:

  • Smart growth:
    • Digital agenda for Europe
    • Innovation Union
    • Youth on the move
  • Sustainable growth:
    • Resource efficient Europe
    • An industrial policy for the globalization era
  • Inclusive growth:
    • An agenda for new skills and jobs
    • European platform against poverty

The Innovation Union is one of the seven flagship initiatives of the Europe 2020 strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. Innovation Union aims to create an innovation-friendly environment that makes it easier for great ideas to be turned into products and services contributing to economic growth and jobs. It is the key not only to creating more jobs, building a greener society and improving quality of life, but also to maintaining the EU’s competitiveness in the global market.

The Innovation Union plan contains over thirty actions points, with the aim to achieve three main goals:

  • Make Europe into a world-class science performer
  • Remove obstacles to innovation which currently prevent ideas getting quickly to market

Revolutionize the way public and private sectors work together

The Innovation Union contains ground-breaking initiatives like the European Innovation Partnerships between the European institutions, national and regional authorities and business.
For detailed information  please visit http://ec.europa.eu/europe2020/index_en.htm

The Republic of Korea is one of the priority partners of the EU in the global economy. The impressive economic and technological progress Korea has been demonstrating for last several decades has brought the country to the forefront of the world’s powerhouses. The Korean economy is now the 12th largest in the world, one of the strongest “Asian tigers” and a key trade & investments partner for Europe. Korean R&D expenditures are above 4% of the country’s GDP, well above Europe and the OECD average.

Korea-EU Agreement for S&T Cooperation

The first contact between Korean and European researchers and S&T authorities was established in the 1990’s. And the importance of EU-Korean S&T cooperation for both parties was recognized. This resulted in the inclusion of this area in EU-Korea MOU for S&T cooperation.

In November 2006, as a new breakthrough in S&T cooperation the Agreement on S&T Cooperation between Korea and the EU was signed. This agreement declares the importance of mutual access to the research, technological development and innovation programmes and projects of each party. This same year, two cooperation agreements were formalised:  Civil Global Navigation Satellite System and ITER-project.

The principle of reciprocity in providing access to research & innovation programs of the Parties is a new commitment that is crucial to building fair and mutually beneficial S&T cooperation. The Agreement entered into force in April 2007. Since then, cooperation has developed with a strong focus on key thematic areas and growing potential appeared such as in regards to mobility of researchers.

  • Korea-EU MOU for S&T Cooperation (1992)
  • Korea-EU Agreement for S&T Cooperation (2006)
  • Korea-EU Agreement for ITER Cooperation (2006)
  • Korea-EU Agreement for Galileo Cooperation (2006)

KIC-Europe offers its partners and community access to relevant opportunities for EC funded grants and tenders.  Our centre has the intention to collectively build-up a strategy and pooling knowledge/practices base within their network, enabling a pool to consistently capture relevant opportunities, principally under  Erasmus+COSME and in particular research & innovation programmes such as Horizon 2020.

Positioning KIC-Europe at a pan-European level has the strategic mission to gain relevant and credible experts/multipliers in our core activities. We do so by sharing intelligence, conducting market research, analysing data, documents, publications and celebrating domestic and international events & meetings.
This enables us to catch business opportunities and collaborative projects, supporting:

  • Technology commercialisation activities
  • Development of early stage ventures and SMEs
  • Business incubation/ acceleration
  • Access to capital
  • Internationalisation, mentorship of startups

Please contact us if you are looking for project partners in the aforementioned domains. KIC-Europe is ready to take part as partner on projects and research proposals; and available for collaboration on R&D and all forms of innovation projects.

A large part of Horizon 2020 requires the set-up of teams, so-called consortia, with partners from various countries. Typically, consortia can include a large variety of members from various sectors (academia, large industries, SMEs, R&D organisations…) and backgrounds.

Putting together a consortium that includes partners whose expertise complements one another is an important guarantee for success. A consortium must be composed of at least three participants coming from at least three EU Member States or associated countries (legal entities must be independent of each other). Each consortium must be comprised of a coordinating organisation (coordinator).

Should you consider KIC-Europe or our associated organisations spark your interest in this domain, please contact us to make sure that your project idea is in line with our overall strategy.

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